Sumptuous sounds of Society at Griffin gig

Society is a three piece country rock band from West Sussex who play The Griffin, Frome, on Saturday, from 8pm.  Their gorgeous three part harmonies set them apart from the current crop of Americana or West Coast rock wanabees in the UK.

Society comprise of guitarist Matt Wise, bassist Ben Lancaster and on all things percussive F Scott Kenny. Their recorded and live sound has echoes of C.S.N.Y, The Band, The Heartbreakers, The Jayhawks and the late great Ronnie Lane and Slim Chance.  Matt Wise composes most if not all of their material and when all three sing in harmony the result is simply stunning.

Since forming in 2004 Society have supported many great visiting artistes when they toured the UK, opening for notable musicians and performers such as Eve Selis, Deadstring Brothers, Corb Lund, Luke Doucet and The Wailin’ Jennys.  Apart from their own UK headline shows, Society have completed two tours of Canada along with a string of dates in the American mid-west gaining a whole new legion of fans in the USA.

This constant touring has honed both their musical and vocal chops and in the winter of 2008 Society left their disused stable that served as their rehearsal space and spent time at The Brickhouse Studios near Brighton recording their debut release entitled Songs From The Brickhouse .

Visit www.myspace.com/societymusic for further information.

On Sunday, The Griffin welcomes back Alan Coles & The Mighty Oaks at 1pm.

Pub’s toast of the town for real ale fans

A Frome pub has been awarded the coveted title of the best pub in the Bath area.

The Griffin, in Milk Street, was on of five pubs in the area to be nominated.  Representatives form the Campaign for Real Ale (CAMRA) presented the award after the organisation announced its deeicios earlier this month.

The pub was judged on the number of criteria including atmosphere, value for money and sympathy to CAMRA’s aims.  James Honey, chairman of thelocal CAMRA branch, said: ” The Griffin consistently has very good beer, throughout the year, as well as a brilliant atmosphere.” Griffin manager Charlie Thomas said the pub is really proud of the award.  She said: “The Griffin won the same award 10 years ago in 2000, so it seems fitting that we should win it again, 10 years on, after so much hard work has been put into the pub”.

Article and photo courtesy of Somerset Standard

Mells Bells launch

Organisers of Mells Daffodil Festival, Martin Cox and John Earl join me for a pint of the good stuff, to celebrate the launch of Mells Bells, the delicious ale brewed especially for the festival.  Cheers!

Photo courtesy of Somerset Standard

Milk Street Brewery takes Silver Award in national beer competition

Milk Street Brewery in Frome has taken a Silver Award in the National Beer Competition held by the Society of Independent Brewers (SIBA). The winners were announced last week in Stratford-on-Avon.

The brewery’s Funky Monkey, a summer ale boasting as many fruity flavours and aromas as a grocer’s counter, won the Award in the Champion Bitters & Pale Ales category.  It was one of just 27 beers to win a national title, from the 1,400 that entered the initial stages of the competition. To succeed, Funky Monkey had to come through one of seven regional heats, followed by a final judging in Nottingham last month for the short-listed 63 beers.

Richard Lyall says, “We are very proud of our beers and delighted to win this Award, ahead of some of the finest brewers in the country.  We’re grateful to everyone at our brewery, and to the many people locally who have helped us to brew great beer. We promise to continue doing so for many more years, and hope that this Award will help us to bring our beers to many more people.”

Gordon Tilley of Award sponsor Crisp Malting presenting the Award to Richard Lyall

Singer’s soulful hometown show

A London-based former Frome College student will be returning to the town on Saturday with her band, April In The Shade, to play The Griffin pub.  Fronted by Holly Rhed, the band has been together for six months but the future looks bright.  Your Time spoke to Holly to get the lowdown.

Your Time: This show is something of a homecoming for you. Did you move to London to pursue a music career?

Holly: I moved to London for university, but this wasn’t music motivated.  I have been in several bands in my time there but they didn’t work out and I wanted to focus on and write my own music.  I’m really excited about coming back to my hometown to celebrate with friends, family and hopefully acquire some new fans too.  We have our first headline show at the Dublin Castle, a legendary venue on the London gig circuit, and all of us wanted to celebrate by playing our home towns.

When you lived in Frome did you perform in any bands that people might remember?

Yes, while at Frome College I performed at the Frome Festival and toured twice to Germany and Czech Republic with the shows Marina Blue (an adaptation of Shakespeare’s Pericles – Prince of Tyre) and All You Need Is Love, I also used to take part with FAOS shows from a young age.  I think my highlight was performing at One World music festival at Nunney Catch, where I sang Love Hurts from Marina Blue.

How did April In The Shade come together?

Myself and Dave (guitar) met last April and began writing music. We started out playing on the London open mic scene as a duo, but wanted to develop our songs and became a four-piece when we introduced Nancy (bass) and Paul (drums).  Right from the onset we have had amazing chemistry together and this energy shows when we come together on stage.  We had our first gig in Camden within six weeks of forming as a band, which we sold out through word of mouth.

Can you tell us a bit about your musical style and influences?

My main influence is soul, Northern soul and Motown which I think comes through in my melodies and catchy lyrics.  I was brought up on this sort of music, so I have my parents to thank for that – I think Sitting on the Dock of the Bay has got to be one of my all time favourite songs.  We have a wide range of influences as a band which again comes through in our music, ranging from Bruce Springsteen and Pearl Jam to Metallica – I haven’t yet found anyone that can classify our sound!

Have you got a CD and what do you write about in your songs?

We are releasing our first single, Stop, in the next month and are working on a video with girl dance troop Sparkle Motion.  I write about anything that moves me, some are stories about people I know, some from my own experiences – love and life.

What can people expect at your Griffin gig this weekend?

You could expect no less than a night of music stepped out with the ideals of a past musical generation.  Be filled with anthemic, heart felt indie blues, songs that will make you feel heated, make you cry and then make you want to get up and dance.  I have so far been compared to Joni Mitchell, PJ Harvey, Beth Ditto and Blondie, so come and make up your own mind!  We will also be joined by Frome FM’s Ben Waller as support.  I believe it’s quite snug so make sure you get there early!

What do you hope to achieve with April In The Shade?

We are ultimately making music because we love it. If we were able to move to next level and be signed that would be amazing obviously.  We are continually broadening our fan base and playing more and more gigs out of London, we are even booked play at Corris Festival in Snowdonia in September.  We would also love to play Frome Festival – so fingers crossed we get picked!

Admission on Saturday is free.

For further information visit www.aprilintheshade.com.

Text from Somerset Standard article

Frome gets set for Tour of Britain

THE world’s leading cyclists will be speeding through Frome next week and the town is preparing to greet them in style.

The town council has erected new signs to give a warm welcome to Tour of Britain racers and supporters, and Milk Street Brewery has launched a commemorative ale to provide an even warmer welcome.

The high profile cycle race sets out from Frome next Thursday (17th September).

To mark the occasion, the town is hosting a Velo Jam on Wednesday evening. The event runs from 6pm to 9pm, and includes the Catherine Hill Cobble Wobble family cycling event, mountain bike displays, trade stands and exhibitions in the Cheese and Grain.

The Catherine Hill Cobble Wobble is an uphill, timed cycle race and is open to all. Milk Street Brewery, based in Frome’s Griffin Inn, has named its new real ale Cobble Wobble after the event. To find our more about taking part, call 01373 469590.

Race day begins at 8am when spectators will be able to welcome the cyclists including star rider Bradley Wiggins. The crowds will be able to cheer on the 96 riders as they depart the Market Yard Car Park at approximately 10am.

Road closures on the race route will not be enforced until riders are ready to depart. These will be in place in Frome from 10am until 10.30am. A rolling road closure will be enforced along the race route from 20 minutes before the first rider passes through until the last bike has passed.

Mendip will be at the centre of the sporting spotlight when the world’s top cyclists saddle up for stage six of the Tour of Britain.

After setting out from Frome on Thursday morning, racers will make their way to Shepton Mallet on what will be the first time the district of Mendip has hosted the start of the event. The race will then wind its way through the villages and towns of Somerset and on to Devon with a grand finish in Yeovil on Friday September.race.”

Friday, September 11, 2009, 01:00

THE world’s leading cyclists will be speeding through Frome next week and the town is preparing to greet them in style.

The town council has erected new signs to give a warm welcome to Tour of Britain racers and supporters, and Milk Street Brewery has launched a commemorative ale to provide an even warmer welcome.

The high profile cycle race sets out from Frome next Thursday (17th September).

To mark the occasion, the town is hosting a Velo Jam on Wednesday evening. The event runs from 6pm to 9pm, and includes the Catherine Hill Cobble Wobble family cycling event, mountain bike displays, trade stands and exhibitions in the Cheese and Grain.

The Catherine Hill Cobble Wobble is an uphill, timed cycle race and is open to all. Milk Street Brewery, based in Frome’s Griffin Inn, has named its new real ale Cobble Wobble after the event. To find our more about taking part, call 01373 469590.

Race day begins at 8am when spectators will be able to welcome the cyclists including star rider Bradley Wiggins. The crowds will be able to cheer on the 96 riders as they depart the Market Yard Car Park at approximately 10am.

Road closures on the race route will not be enforced until riders are ready to depart. These will be in place in Frome from 10am until 10.30am. A rolling road closure will be enforced along the race route from 20 minutes before the first rider passes through until the last bike has passed.

Mendip will be at the centre of the sporting spotlight when the world’s top cyclists saddle up for stage six of the Tour of Britain.

After setting out from Frome on Thursday morning, racers will make their way to Shepton Mallet on what will be the first time the district of Mendip has hosted the start of the event. The race will then wind its way through the villages and towns of Somerset and on to Devon with a grand finish in Yeovil on Friday September.race.”

Somerset Standard article

Live music and private club to boost nightlife

Frome’s nightlife has been given a boost this week after licence applications for live music at a pub and the opening of a private members’ bar were given the green light – despite concerns from people in the town.

The Griffin, in Milk Street, had asked to be allowed to host live acoustic music on Sunday afternoons, while the former curry house on the Bridge in the town centre was hoping to be granted permission to become a private members’ club.

Both applications had attracted controversy and had been deferred at previous meetings of Mendip District Council’s licensing board in Shepton Mallet.

The Griffin’s application had raised serious issues from three residents who had been concerned about noise.

Peter and Patricia Drew, and Judy Hosegood, who live opposite the pub, said they had no problem with the Griffin playing live music but were unhappy with noise levels in previous months, including around the time of the Frome Festival and at Christmas.

But regulars were angered at restrictions that were imposed at the pub after the complaints and began a campaign to get live music reinstated.

The Somerset Standard reported last month that they had collected more than 450 signatures in a petition when a noise restriction was imposed by Mendip.

The petition was started by Gaz Hutchinson, who has been going to the pub for the past seven years. He said that an 82 decibel limit imposed by the council was “ridiculous”.

But licensing sub-committee chairwoman Cllr Margaret Robinson (Con, Shepton East) said she was satisfied that as long as conditions attached to the licence – which included music ending at 11pm, all external windows being kept closed during music events and a noise management policy being submitted to the licensing authority – were adhered to, the application could be granted.

The board also voted to give permission to the members’ club – although 40 conditions have been attached to the approval, all of which must be kept for the club to keep its licence.

The applicant, Abdul Rahim, had asked to have an alcohol licence until 11.30pm from Sunday to Wednesday and 1.30am from Thursday to Saturday; to be allowed to play both live and recorded music; and to have dancing – including belly dancing – at the club.

A previous application which had included plans for lap dancing and striptease was withdrawn at the end of last month after a flood of complaints.

Although these had been removed from the new application, several residents spoke at the meeting on Tuesday to voice their concerns about other issues such as noise levels, anti-social behaviour and late-night drinking.

The police also attended with a list of conditions they wanted added to the licence application, which included a smoking and drugs policy and CCTV requirements.

Sgt Jim Waugh, of Frome’s Neighbourhood policing team, said he felt confident that if the licence was granted the policies in place would be reviewed regularly, and were meant to be a preventative measure instead of reactive.

Mr Rahim told the committee that the club would have a capacity for 60 members and that the membership fee would be £15 a year.

He added that a membership committee would be set up so that people could be vetted. Mr Rahim also told the committee there were several other licensed premises in the town that had similar opening hours as he had requested and said the establishment would be a professional set-up.

The committee said they had been mindful of residents’ concerns and taken into account the measures agreed by the police.

They added that they had decided to impose additional restrictions to assist in the promotion of the prevention of a public nuisance, and granted the application.

The club is expected to open by the autumn.

Somerset Standard article

Disgraceful restriction placed on pub

I’m a local reader who has recently become very, very concerned about the activities of Mendip District Council’s Environmental Health Department in relation to what I consider to be discriminatory, disproportionate and heavy handed restrictions placed on the Griffin, in Frome.

The background is that, for some reason, Mendip has imposed impossibly stringent noise restrictions on the pub, a well known music venue for many, many years.

The decibel limit imposed is so ridiculously taught and constraining that live performance has been rendered impossible.

I’m not sure of the exact decibel limits being applied, but, as an example of how ridiculous the constraints are, during the Frome Festival the landlady was outside the pub in light rain, worried to death because the band sound-checking inside that evening appeared to be over the limit on the db meter she was using to check outside noise levels.

I was watching events as they unfolded when she realised it was in fact the rain landing on her umbrella that was causing the reading, generating a noise level higher than the council has specified and allowed live music to be play at.

No band has been able to play inside the Griffin at the ridiculously low levels imposed – festival gigs have had to be shortened or abandoned part way through this year and many musicians have found that even without an amplifier, their instruments far exceed the level Mendip requires not to be exceeded when measuring from inside the venue.

All in all, the levels imposed are both ridiculous and unachievable.

We all know that public houses are having a really difficult time at the moment and as a result our social heritage is disappearing before our very eyes.

I am of the opinion that from a cultural perspective, Mendip should be supporting local businesses which provide such an important social function. But here we seem to have an example of an out of control jobsworth department of Mendip acting in such a heavy-handed and unnecessary fashion that, in my opinion, they are most likely going to be responsible for putting this long-established and much-loved music venue out of business altogether. It is disgraceful.

All in all, the whole thing is a total disgrace and I feel something must be done to redress the activities of this council department.

CLINT DANDO

Frome

The July 16 edition of the Somerset Standard features a typical example of Mendip District Council’s capacity to attempt to baffle brains with cow manure.

In the article about the campaign to save live music at the Griffin pub (“Petition over restriction on pub noise”) the council spokeswoman said “Good working practice has been relayed to the Griffin by the environmental protection team at the council and we will continue to work with them to assist them in complying with the operating schedule and to promote the licensing objectives”.

What on earth does she mean?

DUNCAN CAMPBELL

Butts Hill, Frome

Town’s tunnel tour reveals hidden history

Dark cellars and dirty wet underground tunnels may not be everyone’s idea of fun but for a group of Frome amateur historians the past five years has seen them searching beneath the town investigating what history may lie beneath the streets.

To give people a sneak preview of what they have been doing the group took visitors enjoying the Frome Festival on a tour of three of their key finds.

The team has been looking at underground features to help build up a picture of historic Frome, and investigations so far have included some of the waterways under the town centre, underground water channels at the Silk Mill and an 80ft deep well on Locks Hill.

All of these sites date back two, three and 400 years and are likely to have been created at the same time as some of the rumoured tunnel system.

Visitors first made a trip to The Wheat Sheaves in Bath Street and donning head torches and hard hats descended below the popular pub to view the unique four large inter connected cellars dating back from before the time the Bath Road itself was built.

Alongside the tour under the tunnels beneath the bridge in the town visitors were treated to an eye opening sight, an Elizabethan ice house beneath one of Frome’s oldest pubs, The Lamb and Fountain in Castle Street, which astonishingly could keep ice frozen for up to two years.

Beneath the pub there was also a brewery and huge cellars that are still in virtually the same state as when they were operational.

The team has also recently discovered three blocked tunnels in The Griffin on Milk Street.

Many of the town’s other older inns are rumoured to have similar structures, as are some of Frome’s churches.

This has led to speculation that Frome has a tunnel system dating back to the Reformation, which priests and smugglers would have used as escape routes with rumours of the tunnels heading out of the town as far as Nunney.

Robin Hill, co-founder of the tunnel team, said: “If tunnels do exist, they were practically created over a wide time period, perhaps for a variety of reasons however we are certain that other than drainage works, ‘secret tunnels’ must have been create for very good reasons, which had significant funding behind them.”

Suzanne Norbury

Somerset Standard article

Petition over restriction on pub noise

Customers at a music venue in Frome have started a petition after Mendip District Council imposed a restriction on noise levels.

Regulars at the Griffin, in Milk Street, have collected more than 450 signatures protesting against the restrictions which were introduced after residents complained to the council about the noise level when bands are playing.

Gaz Hutchinson, who has been going to the pub for the last seven years, claims the council has imposed an 82 decibel limit, but this has not been confirmed by the pub or the council.

He said: “The Griffin is an established music venue in the town, but with the council’s restriction it limits the number of live bands. One band during the festival had to stop half way through their set because of it.

“The limit means that even a normal conversation will exceed it – it’s ridiculous.”

Mr Hutchinson, who plays with the band Slippery Fish, said the Griffin had done as much as it could to reduce noise levels, including installing double glazed windows, floor to ceiling curtains and heavy shutters.

Rik Lyall, who owns the pub and the Milk Street brewery, said there was little he could do.

He said: “I have to adhere to the restrictions on my licence because that is the law.”

A spokeswoman for the district council said that all licensed premises are under obligation to promote the licensing objectives.

She said: “Good working practice has been relayed to the Griffin by the environmental protection team at the council and we will continue to work with them to assist them in complying with the operating schedule and to promote the licensing objectives.”

Somerset Standard article

COMMENTS

  • I’ve been playing gigs at this venue since 2003 with my group the Bad Detectives and there never seemed to be a problem until recently. It seems that one new resident has complained about the noise causing the environmental authorities to go right over the top. Due to the large amount of costly noise suppression installed by the landlord the noise from the pub can now be barely detected in the street. I know this because we were the band that were forced to stop in mid-set during the festival however friends of ours arriving late to the event said that they had to get through the doors to check that we were playing as the sound was inaudible in Milk St. This town is losing pubs at an alarming rate and one of the big attractions for punters at the Griffin is that it is a lively, vibrant music venue with no trouble and no need for teams of bouncers on the doors. As for people who move in to premises next to pubs and villiage halls without checking the nature of the premises – don’t even get me started on that – “caveat emptor” (buyer beware) should apply in all cases.
    Henry Hutton, Nightingale Avenue Frome
    commented on 16-Jul-2009 14:48
  • “promoting the licensing objectives” is all well and good as long as it is applied fairly across the board. It would appear that some can open all hours with little restriction on noise or behavioural problems whilst other establishments are constantly hammered.
    With the closure of so many premises perhaps Mendip ought to be a bit more concerned about local employment as well – if people buy/rent a house near a pub what do they expect?
    fromie, frome
    commented on 15-Jul-2009 12:32

Band gets into gear for Griffin gig by motoring on to major Mojo CD

Frome-based band The Bad Detectives, who play the Griffin on Saturday at 8pm, will have one of their tracks featured on a CD which has been handed out to everyone at this year’s Mojo Music Awards.

The band have had their song Ford Capri, from their first album, selected by The Ford Motor Company who sponsors this year’s Mojo Music Awards for a promotional CD.

The band is understandably delighted as is independent record producer Alan Wilson, former founder member of the neo-rockabilly band the Sharks, who owns and runs the Western Star Recording Company at Paulton.

Alan, who produces the band, said: “Ford licensed the track from me and put it on a CD of all songs about Fords, which they handed out free at the award ceremony to all the 1,000 or so celebrities, rockstars and so on.

“They also gave away 500 to motoring journalists around Europe.

“It’s all happening so fast. The guys are over the moon!”

Asked how the band had felt after hearing their song had been picked to go on the CD, band member, Paul Tozer, said: “Well, we’re always amazed when things like this happen, especially at this point in our career.

“We are hoping that it will encourage Henry to write more songs with product placement in them, we want to get ourselves on an advert and retire.”

The band, which has been going in various incarnations since 1976, with the present line-up existing since around 1995, consists of Ivan Bojczuk on bass, Henry Hutton on guitar and vocals, Andy Stradling on harmonica, organ, melodeon and vocals, Paul Tozer on guitar and vocals, and Chris Woodland on drums.

Asked how they got involved with Western Star, Paul said: “Well, Andy had been over to Western Star a few times to add some harmonica to a few sessions and in 2004 we’d got a little bit of money together, so Alan suggested we write some songs and get over to record them.

“We all really enjoyed those sessions and we had a lot in common with Alan’s interests, so Western Star became our musical home from there on in, we’ve got more than 60 songs under our belt now.

“What’s great about Western Star is that we can just relax and mess about with different ideas and make lots of mistakes without getting self conscious or getting into that snobby muso attitude that can rear its ugly head in some studio environments.

“We basically feel at home there and Alan is a really good studio engineer and producer too, he somehow gets a sound that many bigger and more expensive studios can’t get.

“He has been amazing, without him we wouldn’t have got the three albums out, any of the compilations, or the DVD with three promo videos on it, which has been released all over the world.

“He got us a play on Steve Lamaq’s show on Radio 2, and regular airplay on Geoff Barkers rock ‘n’ roll radio show. He even got us on ITV news when they used our track Surfing On The Severn Bore when covering the Seven Bore.

“Last December, we had our song Cadillac Under My Christmas Tree on a compilation given away with the alternative interest magazine Bizarre called Black Christmas.

“We all contribute when working n song, but Henry writes the majority of the lyrics … but I don’t know where he gets his ides from – he’s mental.

“If you thought there was some odd subject matter on the first two albums, wait until you hear the new one.”

So what should fans expect from a Bad Detectives’ live show?

“Hopefully people get an idea how much fun this is for us,” said Paul.

“You have to remember that we only do this because it’s a laugh, anything that doesn’t look like it will be a laugh, we don’t do – there would be no point.

“The third album is recorded, so we’re hoping to get that out as soon as possible.

“We’re always gigging, so check our website, www.baddetectives.co.uk, for details.”

Admission to the Griffin gig is free. Under-16s must be accompanied by an adult.

Ros Anstey

Somerset Standard article

Griffin Inn sponsors Frome tennis

SET AND MATCH: Coinciding with Wimbledon fortnight, members of Frome Selwood Tennis Club men’s A team pose in their new strips outside their new sponsor, the Griffin Inn, Frome. From left, Gabriel Parker, Jamie Waldron, Charlie Thomas (manager Griffin Inn) Toby Holman, and Joseph Henriques (coach). Frome Selwood Tennis Club is an LTA affiliated club based in Somerset Road on the edge of Victoria Park, Frome

Festival brew honours civil engineer

The official beer of the Frome Festival has been launched by the Milk Street Brewery.

This year’s festival theme is a celebration of the life and works of civil engineer Sir Benjamin Baker.

A Frome man born and bred, he became one of the greatest engineers of his age – the Forth Bridge being one of his many accomplishments.

The beer, named Iron Brew, is a new real ale and has an ABV of 4.1 per cent.

Charlie Thomas, manager of the Griffin pub, which is attached to the Milk Street Brewery, said: “The beer is a full-bodied amber ale with hops.

“It has been brewed to celebrate the visionary genius of the Frome engineer.”

Brewery lays down real ale challenge to other brewers

The owners of the Milk Street Brewery in Frome are marking its 10th anniversary with a beer festival.

Rik Lyall and Nick Bramwell took over the Griffin pub, and created Milk Street Brewery, in 1999. Since then the business has turned into one of the most successful licensed premises in town although Nick left a year ago and Rik now runs it as a sole venture.

The past six months has seen many changes at the pub, and bank holiday weekend will mark the completion of all their hard work.

To mark the brewery’s anniversary, the Griffin is opening its doors to the competition.

The pub’s manager Charlie Thomas said: “Just to prove we really do produce the finest real ales in the land, we will be inviting all the reputable breweries from the area to bring their best beers, for our discerning customers to sample.

Click here for more

“A host of marvellous musicians will be rocking throughout the weekend and we will host a barbecue as well.”

Slippery Fish will kick off proceedings tomorrow.

Miss Thomas added: “It promises to be a fantastic weekend and we hope people will come along to celebrate with us.”

pre-10th-birthday

Photo courtesy of the Somerset Standard

Milk Street Brewery 10th Anniversary Beer Festival

It’s been 10 years since Rik Lyall and Nick Bramwell took over the Griffin pub, and created Milk Street, Brewery of Frome.

The last six months has seen much change in the pub, and May Bank Holiday weekend will mark the completion of all the hard work, and brewery’s birthday party.  With a beautiful large stained glass Griffin window, a new bar, recently re-pointed and painted walls and a lovely replanted garden, the Griffini pub has managed to retain it’s long-established, homely feel, but with a fresh face-lift.

To celebrate this anniversary, the Griffin is opening it’s doors to the competition.  Just to prove that they really do produce the finest real ale in the land, they will be inviting all the reputable breweries in the area to bring their best beers, for our decerning customers to sample.  And what birthday party would be complete without live music?  A whole host of marvellous musicians will be rocking you right through the weeken.  To accompany the fantastic beers, the BBQ will be sizzling, with delicious real ale sausages from Williams butcher.  Serving food Saturday and Sunday from 1pm, right through till 9pm, vegetarians and carnivores will both be catered for.  It promises to be a fantastic weekend, full of beer, sausages, music and great people.  All welcome to the big birthday bash – joinMilk Street for some or all of it!

Japanese-influenced pickled eggs have X-factor at pub event

The winner of the Griffin pub’s Eggs Factor 2009 Championship has been announced as Julie Wait, with her sushi rice vinegar and ginger pickled eggs.

The Frome pub was full to the brim on Easter Sunday with punters eagerly awaiting the judging and crowning of the winner of this new competition.

The panel of judges featured Frome town’s crier Mike Bishop, local Far Que punk legend Badger, musician Griff Daniels and Frank the dog, who all needed to consume a fair amount of ale to wash down the not-aways delightful dishes of pickled eggs.

The judges narrowed the 30 finalists, and the overall winner was judged on label design, smell, appearance and taste.

Charlie Thomas, manager of the pub and compeition organiser, said: ” The day was a huge success; with everyone tasting the eggs after the competition had finished.  All the proceedsfrom the competition went to Dorothy House Hospice.  Live music was provided by The  Little Musgraves, and the real-ale suasges on the barbecue were a real hit with the revellers.”

Somerset Standard

Eggs Factor judges and winner

Contest winner will be well-pickled

More than 30 egg enthusiasts have entered a Frome pub’s charity pickled egg competition, which is due to be judged on Easter Sunday.

Nicknamed the Eggs Factor, a panel of ‘celebrity’ judges will pick the top jar of eggs and a whole afternoon of celebrations is planned.

Charlie Thomas, manager of the Griffin, said she was very excited about the competition.

She said: “I’m really pleased with how many people have entered.

“We’ve had some very interesting recipes, including chilli, chocolate and raspberry, cinnamon and vanilla, and I heard a rumour that one couple, while pickling their eggs, have lost their sink plug.”

Click here!

The Eggs Factor is the first of its kind, and the winner will walk away with a golden eggcup, a champion’s T-shirt.

Miss Thomas said the day would not be complete without musicians, in the shape of Ali George’s new project,The Little Musgraves.

There will also be a barbecue, with real ale sausages with an Easter twist and a vegetarian variety.

All proceeds from the pickled eggs competition will be donated to the Dorothy House charity based at Winsley.

Miss Thomas added: “It will be a great day for all and we look forward to welcoming anyone who wishes to come along.”

13-g1443theeggsfactor_2

Photo courtesy of the Somerset Standard

Somerset Standard article here

Pub’s pickled eggs competition is no yoke

An eggs-traordinary competition has been organised at a Frome pub.  The Griffin, in Milk Street, is hosting the contest – nicknamed the Eggs Factor – to find the ultimate pickled egg.

The idea began as bit of a joke, after pub staff realised customers were getting through more than 25 pickled eggs a week.  So manager Charlie Thomas decided to run a competition to raise money for Dorothy House Hospice.  She said: “We get through a jar a week, which is quite a lot of eggs and as they are so popular in the pub, we thought it would be a great idea to get people to make their ultimate egg.”

Click here!

Anyone can enter the competition, which will be held on Easter Sunday, April 12, at the grand Egg-Off.  Only authentic eggs with genuine ingredients will be eligible to enter, and they will be judged on their taste, overall appearance and labelling or packaging.

Prizes include a gold leaf gilt egg-cup and T-shirts.  There will be a panel of celebrity judges, which have yet to be announced.

It costs £2 to enter and people can put forward as many eggs as they like.  Anyone interested in taking part can call Miss Thomas on 01373 467766.

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Photos courtesy of the Somerset Standard

Somerset Standard article

Get a nose for wines at pub’s women’s day event

The Griffin pub, in Frome, is organising a wine tasting evening to celebrate International Women’s Day next week.

The event has been organised by the pub manager, Charlie Thomas, and all funds will go to international charity Women in Action.  The charity promotes cultural exchange and improves lives through sustainable community development.

There will be a selection of different wines to taste and the pub is bringing in professional wine consultant Oliver Weston.  The wine tasting will be held on Wednesday and begins at m.Click here!

Tickets cost £10 in advance, including all wine, entertainment and nibbles.

For more information, call Miss Thomas on 01373 467766.

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Photo courtesy of the Somerset Standard

Somerset Standard article here

Griffin gears up for a weekend of great gigs

The Griffin pub in Frome will host a scintillating weekend of live music, starting tomorrow, with Phantom Limb.

The Griffin’s intimate setting makes for the perfect venue to catch the heavy southern-fried soul band.  Featuring Dan Brown (bass), Matt Jones (drums), Dan Moore (keyboards), Stew Jackson (guitar) and Yolanda Quarty (vocals), this Bristol-based bands roots lie in the Stax, Atlantic, gospel, country and good old-fashioned rock ‘n’ roll.  Imagine Aretha mixing it up with Led Zeppelin and Johnny Cash, then you’ll know what kind of noise Phantom Limb will bring to the party.

As part of their current tour, Boot Hill Allstars return to the Griffin on Saturday for another evening chock-full of choice cuts of the finest boot-legged hoedown.  Support comes from Who’s Afear’d who play classic tunes with a Dorset-loving twist.

On Sunday, Kara Richardson will be playing The Griffin’s Sausage Sunday.  Kara has been singing since the age of eight and, having played with a variety of diverse bands, has gained a wide range of musical experience. She has performed everything from Latino ska to Celtic heavy metal.

The sausage barbecue starts from 1pm.

Somserset Standard article here

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